NO CHEWING GUM

In 1999, The Wrigley Jr. Company lobbied to get the chewing gum ban lifted from the United States-Singapore Free Trade Agreement, resulting in medicinal gum being sold again at dental clinics and pharmacies.

In the 1980s, Singaporeans chewed gum freely. Then, a couple of smart alecs decided that they would dispose the chewed gum any old way they saw fit - in letterboxes, between lift doors, on elevator buttons and under bus seats. The last straw came when vandals began sticking gum on the door sensors of MRT trains, causing disruption of train services. So in 1992, chewing gum was banned. Today, we’re known as the cleanest nation in the world. And we’ve got every Singaporean to thank for it. If it weren’t for our willingness to do our part, clean up after ourselves, and sacrifice the love for gum for the greater love of the nation – this wouldn’t be possible! 

Trivia:
In 1999, The Wrigley Jr. Company lobbied to get the chewing gum ban lifted from the United States-Singapore Free Trade Agreement, resulting in medicinal gum being sold again at dental clinics and pharmacies.

No Chewing Gum
No Chewing Gum

What other snack or sweet have you found to be a worthy replacement for chewing gum?